Seattle Office of Film + Music


NEW iPHONE APP BRINGS LISTENERS CLASSICAL MUSIC
July 28, 2011, 12:50 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , ,

New Classical Music Apps
Commercial radio used to be the almighty power in providing free music for people.  However, with the rise of the smart-phone empire, radio has slowly begun to transform in appearance, mostly wearing the cloak of mobile applications.  There are several new FREE iPhone apps such as Classical Music I: Master’s Collection Vol. 1 (a limited edition) and Classical Music Radio(free on Apple and Android). For the classical music inclined, these new-wave “radio stations” offer carefully curated playlists flowering with popular performances.  Genre-specific apps like these keep listeners’ ears hip to the genres they love most, and best of all, they don’t cost a dime.

Bookmark and Share


TED TALKS AIRS PERFORMANCE BY CELLIST JOSHUA ROMAN
June 17, 2011, 10:08 am
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , ,

TED
TED (which stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design) has made a name for itself by broadcasting hundreds of free lectures and performances by the most innovative minds in the arts, sciences, humanities and beyond. Former Seattle Symphony principal cellist Joshua Roman was recently chosen as a 2011 TED Fellow. At age 22, Roman was the youngest principal musician in the Seattle Symphony’s history, and he’s been dubbed a “Classical Rock Star” by the media. He left the Seattle Symphony in 2008 to pursue a solo career. In March he performed a duet with LA Philharmonic violinist Robert Gupta (a TED senior fellow) of “Passacaglia,” a piece by Norwegian composer Johan Halvorsen. Filmed for TED before a live audience, the video is a testament to successful musical collaborations and the powerful beauty of classical music.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

TED TALKS AIRS PERFORMANCE BY CELLIST JOSHUA ROMAN, posted with vodpod
Bookmark and Share


SEATTLE SYMPHONY’S GERARD SCHWARZ TO BE HONORED WITH A STREET NAMING CEREMONY

Seattle City Council
To commemorate the retirement of Seattle Symphony Music Director Gerard Schwarz, the Seattle City Council will adopt a resolution to give University Street from Second Avenue to Third Avenue the honorary name of “Gerard Schwarz Place.” A ceremony hosted by Councilmember Tom Rassmussen will take place today outside Benaroya Hall. A longtime fixture of the classical music community, Schwarz dedicated 26 years to the Seattle Symphony and was integral in the creation of Benaroya Hall, which opened in 1998. Under his leadership, the Seattle Symphony received 12 Grammy nominations and won two Emmy Awards for two self-produced television specials, Seattle Symphony From Benaroya Hall in 2007 and Seattle Symphony From Benaroya Hall: Brahms, Kernis and Kodaly in 2008. Schwarz also worked closely with the Seattle Opera and the Mostly Mozart Festival over many years. Following his retirement, Schwarz will assume the title Conductor Laureate and will continue to conduct the Seattle Symphony for several weeks each season.

Bookmark and Share


CLASSICAL-MUSIC EVENTS ALREADY BUBBLING UP IN SEATTLE
August 28, 2009, 11:42 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , , ,

Seattle Times
With summer chamber festivals winding down and the big concert-hall season yet to begin, things are a little slow on the classical-music front. Still, there’s some curious local activity bubbling up in oddball corners of town. This week, the Early Music Guild and the Seattle Composers’ Salon offer, respectively, programs that range from stately baroque to ear-stretching avant-garde.



BUSINESSES USING MUSIC TO DETER CRIME AND LOITERING
July 27, 2009, 12:59 pm
Filed under: Miscellaneous, Music | Tags: ,

Seattle Times
The classical music blaring from speakers mounted on the light posts in a Rainier Beach parking lot keeps Richelle Reason walking. She never stops to hear the next song in the storefront symphony. “It’s kind of annoying,” she said of the music in the Saar’s Market Place parking lot on South Henderson Street. That’s exactly the point. The market started using classical music about three years ago to repel loiterers and vandals from their buildings. Dr. Daniel Levitin, professor of psychology and neuroscience at McGill University in Montreal, and author of “This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession,” said the musical mind games such as this are similar to the way department stores using different genres in each department attract diverse demographics. But Levitin cautioned about being elitist or ethnocentric in linking good behavior with classical music and other fine arts. “I think hip-hop or R&B or heavy metal, in the right circumstances, can make someone feel kind, sensitive or inspired,” he said.