Seattle Office of Film + Music


KEXP DOCUMENTARY SERIES PROFILES LOCAL JAZZ “SIREN”
November 19, 2010, 3:53 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: , ,

KEXP
Renowned Seattle vocalist Ernestine Anderson is profiled in the latest installment of KEXP’s “Sirens of Jazz,” a 10-part documentary series that features the station’s favorite female jazz voices. KEXP says Anderson was chosen for her signature bluesy style that still somehow fits into the realm of jazz, and for a “special twist of talent” that has garnered the singer, now 72, international acclaim throughout her long and storied career. KEXP interviewed Anderson in her Central District home –which she almost lost due to lack of income a few years back until Quincy Jones himself intervened. Says Anderson, “I can be down in spirit and I put on a record and I’m up again. Music changes your attitude.” To hear the entire documentary, follow the link.

Bookmark and Share


ASK MOHAI: SEATTLE’S JAZZ HISTORY
September 3, 2010, 11:12 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , ,

Seattlepi.com
Seattle is definitely known as a music town, but the city’s jazz scene is not often the most prominent genre of conversation. Each week Seattlepi.com asks the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) a question about Seattle’s history, and this week they asked “Was Seattle ever a jazz city?” MOHAI’s Phyllis Franklin and Helen Divjak answer that up until about the 1960s, the Jackson Street jazz scene was thriving. “In fact, beginning the nineteen- teens, Seattle began to develop a considerable jazz scene that would eventually become the West Coast’s best, helping to establish the careers of many legendary performers, including Quincy Jones, Ray Charles and singer Ernestine Anderson,” they write. Once racial barriers were broken, the isolation of the jazz clubs and communities lessened, and other forms of music became more popular. To read MOHAI’s full response, follow the link.

Bookmark and Share



TAKE A LOOK AT SEATTLE’S MUSIC HISTORY
August 27, 2010, 11:07 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , ,

Seattlepi.com
Each week Seattlepi.com hosts a series called Seattle Rewind, and this week’s retrospective focuses on the Seattle music scene. The article and companion radio segment discuss local musicians, entertainment establishments and radio personalities that helped shape the city and country’s musical history. Obvious fixtures such as Jimi Hendrix and Quincy Jones are highlighted, but lesser known artists like Ernestine Anderson and disc jockey Pat O’Day are also mentioned and embraced. Follow the link above for the article and accompanying collection of photographs.

Bookmark and Share



SEATTLE REPERTORY JAZZ ORCHESTRA PLAYS TRIBUTE TO RAY CHARLES AND QUINCY JONES

Seattle Timesray quincy earshot
Ray Charles and Quincy Jones were teenagers when they met in a Seattle nightclub, one of dozens clustered around Jackson Street in the 1940s. They were both aspiring jazz musicians, Charles a pianist, Jones a trumpeter. They were among many now- familiar names who got their start in Seattle: Buddy Catlett, Ernestine Anderson, Gerald Wiggins, Floyd Standifer. Jones and Charles eventually achieved the most fame, moving beyond their original genre, becoming stars of pop and R&B. The pair collaborated on the seminal 1961 album “Genius + Soul = Jazz,” which featured Charles on the Hammond B3 organ, with members of the Count Basie band, performing big-band arrangements by Jones. The scores that came out of that collaboration will be performed by Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra in two shows this weekend as part of the Earshot Jazz Festival, which ends Sunday.