Seattle Office of Film + Music


THE HEAD AND THE HEART IS STARBUCKS’ ITUNES PICK OF THE WEEK
November 24, 2010, 12:04 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: , ,

Starbucks
Local favorites The Head and the Heart will soon be heard by caffeine fanatics all over the United States. The up-and-coming band’s song “Down in the Valley” is featured as a Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week. The free download card is now available in over 8,000 Starbucks locations in the U.S. The Head and the Heart has been making waves in the local and now national music scene since last spring. This is another indication that the band is really moving up in the music world. Be sure to grab your free download at participating Starbucks locations!

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APPLE AT WAR WITH AMAZON OVER MP3 “DAILY DEALS”
March 5, 2010, 1:15 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: ,

Billboard
Since June of 2008, Amazon has been offering customers of its MP3 store a “Daily Deal,” selling a recent or classic album for a rock-bottom price. (Usually between $1.99 and $3.99) According to Billboard, Apple’s iTunes, the market leader in MP3 sales, is none too happy with the popularity of Amazon’s deals. So long as Amazon was taking the financial hit and using the deals to drive traffic to their site, no one fussed much. But last year Amazon starting working in concert with major labels to offer pre-street-date exclusives and to help raise opening week sales, and that’s left the people at Apple questioning the loyalty of those labels. “Amazon is fighting a guerrilla war against iTunes, and now iTunes is getting frustrated because they work hard to set up and promote a release weeks in advance of the street date,” a senior major-label distribution executive says, “And then lo and behold, Amazon jumps in there with this deal of the day and scrapes off some of the cream.” To read more about this issue, follow the above link.



INDIE BANDS: MAKE MONEY ON ITUNES
January 27, 2010, 11:45 am
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags:

Business Insider
AC/DC cover band AC/db made over $32,000 from music sales in November. How is that possible? Under the old business model of music sales on physical media, it wouldn’t be. AC/db, on the other hand, just had to do around $45,000 in sales at the iTunes store. After Apple took its 30 cents on the dollar, that left $32,000, of which the band’s distributor, TuneCore, took nothing at all. The company charges an up front fee to process recordings and upload them to music stores like iTunes — which won’t deal with individual artists. The band retains all rights to its music and keeps all the revenue past what the stores keep. With this system, anyone can record just about anything and offer it to the masses on a whim. And if they happen to catch a viral wave, they can end up making a decent living.



HOW CAN MEDIA FIRMS KEEP PACE?
September 9, 2009, 3:11 pm
Filed under: Digital Media, Film | Tags: , , , ,

Hollywood Reporter
What started as a panel discussion about how media companies make money off the Internet evolved into a discussion of how entertainment companies — even such recent entrants as Google, Hulu and YouTube — remain relevant as the pace of change accelerates. Moderator and Disney president Robert Iger framed the first part of the debate by questioning how to get enough money out of new media to keep paying the costs of producing and distributing television shows, movies, games and other content if consumers think they are going to always get everything for free online. “Will we ever be able to monetize our content on new platforms as we did on traditional platforms?” he asked his four panelists, all of whom were from the cyber side of the equation. Chris Anderson, editor in chief of Wired magazine, said the question implies that everything will always be free, but that isn’t the case. “Free and pay are going to co-exist and compete,” he said. Anderson used the example of music. There is lots of it available free on the Web today, but many people still pay to download from iTunes and other sources. He said that is because iTunes is not just selling music, “It’s selling convenience.” Iger asked Chad Hurley, CEO and co-founder of YouTube, how Google was going to get back the money it paid to buy his company. He said that it is adding new formats beyond just showing videos to find the answer. Hurley said YouTube also has added more new applications and formats — including transactional sales — in the first half of 2009 than it did in all of 2008 and that it fine-tunes its model daily, sometimes hourly.



TARGET TEAMS WITH ITUNES FOR PEARL JAM’S “BACKSPACER” DIGITAL RELEASE
August 27, 2009, 11:49 am
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags: , , , , , ,

Rolling StonePearl Jam
In June, news broke that Target stores had secured the exclusive big-box retail rights for Pearl Jam’s upcoming album “Backspacer.” But while Walmart has its own digital music store and Best Buy owns Napster, Target doesn’t have a notable digital music presence. To level the playing field, Target and iTunes announced on Tuesday that the two vendors will team up for a new Target-exclusive section on the iTunes Music Store. Fittingly, the first album that will be offered up in this new pact will be Pearl Jam’s “Backspacer,” due out September 20th.



GERMAN ITUNES ADDS FEATURE FILMS
April 16, 2009, 10:54 am
Filed under: Music | Tags:

Variety
Apple has begun rolling out feature films on its German iTunes Store. The move, which had been expected for some time, allows German customers to download pics from major studios and independents, including titles from Paramount, Warner Bros., MGM, Disney, Sony and local indies Universum Film and Shorts Intl. Among the titles currently available to local users are “The Dark Knight,” “Quantum of Solace,” “Pineapple Express,” “High School Musical 3: Senior Year,” “Eagle Eye” and local productions such as “The Counterfeiters” and “Keinohrhasen” (Rabbit Without Ears).



SOME SALES DOWN AFTER ITUNES PRICE CHANGE
April 16, 2009, 10:52 am
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags: , ,

Hollywood Reporter
Last week’s price changes at iTunes had a measurable effect on the store’s top 100 sellers. In aggregate, the 33 songs that were raised from 99 cents to $1.29 starting April 7 sold 12.5% fewer units last week than they sold in the previous week at the lower price, according to Billboard analysis. The 67 songs that remained at 99 cents sold 9.9% more units compared with the previous week. Despite the price increase, total track sales were up 3% compared with the previous week. Sales of the Billboard Top 200 digital tracks rose 1.3%, and sales of the top 100 tracks rose slightly less than 1%.