Seattle Office of Film + Music


SEA-TAC AIRPORT INTRODUCING TRAVELERS TO LOCAL MUSIC

KOMO NEWS

KOMO News ran a story yesterday about Sir Mix-a-lot lending his voice to the Sea-Tac Airport overhead announcements in the terminal and baggage claim areas as a part of the Sea-Tac Airport Music Initiative. The edgy rapper, whose “Baby Got Back” video was once banned from MTV, talks about his excitement about the initiative. “It’s cool to see something as serious as Sea-Tac embrace the local arts,” said Sir Mix-A-Lot. “It just trips me out. That’s pretty bold.” Mix, along with other local artists, like Quincy Jones, Jerry Cantrell, Allen Stone, and Macklemore, are welcoming and directing passengers to various points of interest, from the USO desk to the smoking sections. The Sea-Tac Airport Music Initiative is a cooperative effort by the Port of Seattle, Seattle Music Commission and music-specialist PlayNetwork showcasing the northwest region’s vibrant music culture and enhancing the experience of millions of passengers who pass through Sea-Tac Airport each year.  Along with the celebrity overhead announcements, the initiative interacts with passengers of the airport through a local music web player, mobile app, music videos featured on terminal and baggage claim monitors, and overhead music in the terminals.



READ THE LATEST SEATTLE HIP-HOP HISTORY ESSAYS POSTED BY HISTORYLINK.ORG
May 11, 2011, 12:16 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , , ,

1984 Underground Hip-Hop Essay
1989 SWASS Essay
Historylink.org, a free online encyclopedia of Washington State history, has added two additional essays chronicling the epoch of Seattle hip-hop and its boisterous beginnings. The retrospective vignettes by Peter Blecha recount pivotal turning points in Seattle’s hip-hop history, including the 1984 rap concert at the Seattle Center Exhibition hall and the release of Sir Mix-A-Lot’s SWASS album in 1989. With the advent of hip-hop talent such as Mix and DJ Nasty Nes entering the scene it was a groundbreaking and progressive period for Seattle hip-hop. To balance out the business end of newly formed Seattle hip-hop labels and rap records going gold (and eventually platinum) there were wild hootenannies such as the 1989 “Nastymix Gold Party.” To read the Seattle rap culture infused expositions follow the Historylinks above and enjoy some old school hip-hop community history from the original golden era of Seattle rap culture.

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SEATTLE’S FORGOTTEN SOUL SCENE “GROOVES” ITS WAY ONTO DVD TODAY

Wheedle’s Groove, the award-winning film chronicling Seattle’s forgotten soul/funk scene of the 60s and 70s, is now available on DVD! With narration by the incomparable Sir Mix-A-Lot, interviews with the stars of Seattle Soul, and commentary from local music icons like Quincy Jones, Kenny G, Soundgarden, Death Cab for Cutie and Mudhoney, the film shines a powerful light on a vibrant and prolific musical movement that “grooved” Seattle decades before the grunge wave that put us on the map. The new DVD—which you can pick up via iTunes, Netflix, Hulu and a host of national retailers– also includes deleted scenes, concert footage, a What’s a Wheedle featurette and more. Also included the DVD special features is the film’s theatrical trailer, which you can peep below in case you just can’t wait until you pick up your own copy of the Groove.

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“WHEEDLE’S GROOVE” – THEATRICAL TRAILER, posted with vodpod

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SEATTLE SPRING RAPFEST ‘87 RETROSPECTIVE
March 29, 2011, 10:25 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , ,

Historylink
Last week Historylink.org, a free online encyclopedia of Washington State history, posted an article chronicling the epoch of Seattle hip-hop and its tumultuous beginnings. The retrospective vignette by Peter Blecha highlights the 1987 Spring Rapfest held at the Paramount in and the events surrounding the concert. With the advent of rappers such as Sir Mix-A-Lot entering the scene it was an exciting time for Seattle hip-hop, but also a turbulent one as Blecha points out in the dissertation. With chaotic clashes and between police, fans and media, Blecha writes, “It was a scene probably not seen in Seattle again until the WTO protests of 1999.” While these events created quite the controversy at the time, they heralded the sheer energy of the Seattle hip-hop era yet to come. To read the Seattle rap culture infused exposition follow the Historylink above and get ready for some old school hip-hop community history.

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NEW SIR-MIX-A-LOT VIDEO
December 3, 2010, 12:56 pm
Filed under: Music | Tags:

The Seattle Times
Sir Mix-A-Lot recently debuted his new video for “Carz” on Youtube, and it has already received almost a million hits. The track mentions and was shot on the Eastside. Now you can see it too!

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SIR-MIX-A-LOT – “CARZ”, posted with vodpod

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FILM TO DOCUMENT SEATTLE’S VINTAGE FUNK & SOUL SCENE

The Stranger
Director Jennifer Maas’, whose latest project was co-producing Lynn Shelton’s Humpday, is working on a feature-length documentary called Wheedle’s Groove, which will explore Seattle’s underrated funk and soul musicians from those genres’ late-’60s/early-’70s heyday. According to the film’s website, the filmmakers have tracked down and interviewed musicians from the scene as well as interviewing Seattle noteables including Quincy Jones, Sir Mix-A-Lot, Mark Arm (Mudhoney), Ben Shepherd (Soundgarden), and Ben Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie) The film is nearing completion, with a release slated for 2010. Here is a little preview of what to expect from the doc:

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more about "FILM TO DOCUMENT SEATTLE’S VINTAGE FU…", posted with vodpod