Seattle Office of Film + Music


PRIME TIME TO BE A FILMMAKER IN SEATTLE

SUN TIMES
Seattleites not only hold the title of #1 moviegoers in the country, they also live a burgeoning mecca of creativity and filmmaking. In the past year, Sundance film festival hosted four films shot in Washington State.  Filmmaking talent in Seattle has filled the big screen (and big festivals), such as Lynn Shelton with Humpday and her more recently released Your Sister’s Sister, and Megan Griffiths with The Off Hours—now available on-demand after its Sundance. This article discusses the conventional commercial viability and availability and where the thoughtful and intimate The Off Hours fits in that paradigm.

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SHHH! LYNN SHELTON AND MEGAN GRIFFITHS ARE THE SPECIAL GUESTS AT THE SORRENTO’S READING PARTY TONIGHT
February 2, 2011, 4:05 pm
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The Stranger
Join Seattle filmmakers and recent Sundancers Lynn Shelton and Megan Griffiths at tonight’s free first Wednesday Reading Party hosted by The Sorrento Hotel. The monthly Reading Party is not so much a “party” per se—indeed the event reads more like a decidedly “un-party like” silent reading collective, where attendees can cozy up to a good book and whoop it up in shared solitude. Shelton and Griffiths will be in tow as special silent guests for the event, and the Sorrento will also be serving up drink specials sure to spice up your pulp fiction. The event starts at 6:00 pm, so grab a book and join in on the fun—not too loudly though. People are trying to read. For more details check out the above link.

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THE OFF HOURS PREMIERES AT SUNDANCE
January 18, 2011, 1:51 pm
Filed under: Film | Tags: , ,

The Off Hours
Seattle writer/director Megan Griffiths’ independent feature The Off Hours will premiere at the upcoming Sundance Film Festival. If you are one of the fortunate ones attending the festival this year be sure to keep checking their facebook page and twittery to stay posted on the film’s screening dates, times, and venues at Sundance. Everyone else can do the same to hear updates on how the festival is going for the film and watch the trailer here.
Vodpod videos no longer available.

THE OFF HOURS PREMIERES AT SUNDANCE, posted with vodpod


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“BASS ACKWARDS” DIRECTOR LINAS PHILLIPS ON HIS NON-ROAD MOVIE ROAD MOVIE
January 8, 2010, 11:51 am
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Indie Wire
Director Linas Phillips is back with a new Seattle-based feature, Bass Ackwards, screening in Sundance’s new NEXT section. He previously directed and starred in the documentary “Walking to Werner,” which screened at HotDocs and the Austin Film Festival, and he also has a few acting credits under his belt. His latest follows a man, played by Phillips, driving a ‘76 VW van across America. When humble Linas, kicked off of his friend’s couch and spurned by his lover, finds a forgotten van on a llama farm outside Seattle, he begins lurching east with nothing to lose. Sundance beams that “his utterly original, lyrical, and visually exciting adventure has such a light touch that it quietly sneaks up and tugs you into an overpowering appreciation of being human.” Click the above link to read IndieWIRE’s interview with Phillips.



SUNDANCE, WITH A NEW LEADER, HONES ITS ARTSY EDGE
December 3, 2009, 11:54 am
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New York Times
Sundance, under new leadership, is trying to tilt risky. The programmers of the Sundance Film Festival on Wednesday announced a schedule of competition films that at least in their view, reflect no particular current in independent cinema except one: the artier the better. “We really tried to hunker down and make some hard decisions,” said John Cooper, the festival’s new director. “We tried not to be wishy-washy about what is independent, which I know has been a criticism in the past.” A swing toward art over commerce is perhaps inevitable given the market. Over the last two years studios have folded specialty divisions (Warner Independent, Paramount Vantage) or scaled them back drastically (Miramax). Outside the studio system, financing has become extremely difficult to obtain due to the credit crisis and recession.



WITH A LITTLE HELP, SELF-DISTRIBUTION CAN BE A VIABLE OPTION FOR NEGLECTED INDIES

Hollywood Reporter
As the indie theatrical market continues to struggle, more producers and financiers are shouldering the distribution burden themselves. “The way the independent landscape is right now a lot of good quality independent films don’t see the light of day,” says Stephen Raphael, a New York-based consultant who worked on the indie drama Ballast, along with filmmaker Lance Hammer, after it won an award at Sundance. “We ended up releasing it in 25 markets and in nontheatrical and arts institutions, at universities,” Raphael says. One of the year’s success stories, Valentino: The Last Emperor, went DIY so the filmmakers could retain key rights. Truly Indie, a Dallas company owned by Marc Cuban and Todd Wagner, helped them “four wall” the initial release (rent out the theaters). After a month riding a wave of favorable reviews and publicity, Truly Indie handed off Valentino to L.A. consultant David Schultz, who then booked it in theaters in 125 different cities for a gross of about $1.7 million. Truly Indie isn’t alone in helping facilitate self-distribution. Such for-hire outfits as Freestyle Releasing and Vivendi Entertainment are filling the gap left by the demise of indie players like Warner Independents and Picturehouse.



SUNDANCE CHANNEL UNVEILS VIDEO-ON-DEMAND SERVICE
August 17, 2009, 2:10 pm
Filed under: Film, tv | Tags: , ,

Hollywood Reporter
Cable television’s Sundance Channel on Monday unveiled a video-on-demand service offering documentaries and international films endorsed by Sundance festival founder Robert Redford and often available the same day the movies hit theaters. Sundance Selects will make its debut on August 26 with Spike Lee’s new documentary, Passing Strange: The Movie. The service will be available on cable TV systems owned by three major operators — Comcast Corp, Cox Communications and Cablevision Systems Corp. — reaching as many as 50 million U.S. households.