Seattle Office of Film + Music


@FILMMAKERS USING #TWITTER AND BLOGS TO CONNECT WITH FANS
November 29, 2010, 1:21 pm
Filed under: Film | Tags: ,

The New York Times
The internet has taken over. Obviously, it’s infiltrated all aspects of our lives, and filmmaking is no exception. In a recent New York Times article, various methods for online interaction with film fans are explored. Hollywood and avant-garde directors like Kevin Smith, Pat O’Neill, Jonas Mekas, Ken Jacobs, David Lynch and others are taking advantage of personalized sites and blogs as well as Twitter to connect with fans of their work. Offering the directors’ own insights as well as opportunities to watch clips, make comments and purchase movie swag, these sites allow movie goers another dimension of enjoyment to the theater or home viewing experience. To read the full article, follow the link.

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THE NEW ECONOMY: GOOGLE CALENDAR, YOUTUBE, TWITTER

Billboard
Just about every music industry panel will touch upon new tools available to record, distribute, market, organize and communicate. But Google’s Calendar and Documents? The free online services had fans at Thursday’s American Music Conference panel titled “The New Big Picture: Managing in the New Economy.” “I can organize better with my artists with a viral calendar,” said manager Tim McFadden. “I run my entire business off my Blackberry, basically. Each of my artists has their own calendar.” Free and/or simple was a recurring theme on the panel. Steed talked about the way Julia Nunes, an AC Entertainment-managed artist, has used cheaply recorded videos on YouTube to gain followers and even promote upcoming concerts. Paul Jacobson of Eventful encouraged people to give the fans the power to make crucial decisions. Make sure information is easily shared, he told the audience, so people can actively promote you.



TWITTER TO LAUNCH BUSINESS TOOLS BY YEAR-END
May 19, 2009, 12:31 pm
Filed under: Digital Media | Tags: ,

Wired
Micro-blogging site Twitter plans to introduce tools and services by year-end to help businesses serve their customers, and may charge fees for such services, co-founder Biz Stone said on Monday. “We’re looking at who’s using Twitter and for what,” Stone told the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York via videolink from San Francisco. “Are there any commercial usages that are making a lot of sense?”



ILIKE EXPANDS SOCIAL MUSIC SERVICE TO NEW PLATFORMS
May 13, 2009, 3:39 pm
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags: , , ,

billboard.biz
iLike is expanding its social music service to new platforms such as Twitter, YouTube, and MySpace, as well as introducing a new data feature for artists who use it to promote their music. Hoping to address the problem many artists have with updating multiple social networking services with new information and content, iLike is now syndicating changes to artists’ profiles on these other services. Artists can now link their iLike and Twitter accounts so they can simply Tweet once and have it appear on Twitter, Facebook and iLike profile. And when new music, videos or concert listings are added to the artists’ iLike page, an alert will go out of the change on Twitter. Integration with YouTube is similar. If a new video is added to iLike, that same video will appear on the artists’ YouTube page. Concert listing will be updated on MySpace pages, and artist can add music to their Facebook profiles.



ARTISTS UNLOCK TWITTER’S MUSICAL POTENTIAL
April 13, 2009, 11:41 am
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags: , ,

Wired.com
After securing $35 million in February and continuing its explosive growth, the only thing that is left for Twitter to do now is to go viral with innovation. A pair of musical projects that use the microblogging service could help make that happen: Somali-born hip-hopper K’naan Warsame is revising his song “People Like Me” using fans’ tweets, and the San Francisco sessions vets in Moonalice are planning a repeat performance of their real-time Twitter concert.



MUSIC BUSINESS IS FLOCKING TO TWITTER
January 30, 2009, 11:32 am
Filed under: Digital Media, Music | Tags: ,

Three Imaginary Girls:
Why Twitter? The 140-character limit and mobile-friendly posting means more artists are giving it a go. Texting a “tweet” is radically faster than a blog post, website update, MySpace edit, or email newsletter. Fans have never before had access like this: it’s like a backstage pass with benefits. Closeness — or, rather, the illusion of closeness — offered by Twitter can translate into an increase in loyal fans and more successful touring.