Seattle Office of Film + Music


GOOGLE, MAJOR LABELS PARTNER ON MUSIC SEARCH
October 22, 2009, 10:48 am
Filed under: Music | Tags: , , , , , ,

Billboard
Google Inc is partnering with major music labels to launch a new feature to make it easier for music fans to discover, sample and buy songs on the search engine, according to two people familiar with the plan. The new feature will be facilitated by start-ups iLike and LaLa, which will enable songs to be streamed on the Google page that will also feature a “buy” button to help reduce the number of steps fans need to acquire music. The new service has been lined up to launch next Wednesday by iLike and LaLa and all the major labels — including Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Warner Music Group and EMI Music — will be involved in the launch.



WARNER MUSIC GROUP STRIKES DEAL WITH YOUTUBE
September 28, 2009, 12:19 pm
Filed under: Digital Media, Film, Music | Tags: , ,

Pitchfork
Back in December, a breakdown in negotiations led Warner Music Group to pull all its music from YouTube, which has seriously damaged our ability to hear any song ever just by typing it into YouTube’s search engine. (Warner artists like Death Cab for Cutie weren’t too thrilled about it, either.) But now Advertising Age reports that Warner and YouTube have completed a deal to allow the label’s music back on the site (via Rolling Stone). So: We’ll no longer have to hit up MySpace or DailyMotion or OnSmash or any of the other bajillions of video websites to watch Warner music videos! According to Advertising Age, Warner is also in talks to join Vevo, the music video site that YouTube and Universal Music Group are planning to launch.



WEBCASTERS, MUSIC INDUSTRY AGREE ON ROYALTIES

Wired
Artists and record labels have reached agreement with Internet radio companies over royalty rates, resolving a dispute that dates back more than two years over how to divvy up revenue from streaming music on the Web. The deal establishes a two-tier royalty payment system for companies — such as the popular service offered by Pandora — that broadcast music over the Internet. The agreement calls for large webcasters to pay artists and copyright owners a percentage of all U.S. revenue up to 25 percent or on a per-song basis, which ever is greater. Smaller webcasters — with revenue of less than $1.25 million — will pay a smaller percentage under a different formula. The agreement was announced Tuesday by SoundExchange, a nonprofit group designated by the U.S. Copyright Office to collect and distribute digital music royalties. The group’s members include large record companies such as Sony BMG and Warner Music Group, as well as more than 2,500 independent labels.